Coastal erosion at the Mall Galleries!…

I’m so pleased to announce that four of my artworks have been selected for exhibition at the Royal Institute of Water Colour Painters (RI) at the Mall Galleries, London, 6 to 21 April 2018. This is always an impressive and varied show of contemporary work in water media and well worth visiting if you are able to.

'Equinox', mixed media on paper. Selected for the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 2018. © Mari French 2018.'Emerging forms', mixed media on paper. Selected for the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 2018. © Mari French 2018.

'Byzantine waters', mixed media on paper. Selected for the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 2018. © Mari French 2018.

'Cryptic shore', mixed media on paper. Selected for the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 2018. © Mari French 2018.

The selected paintings: ‘Equinox’, ‘Emerging forms’, ‘Byzantine waters’ and ‘Cryptic shore’ (all shown above) are part of an ongoing series created in response to coastal erosion, which I have been working on over the winter. It’s a subject that has been in my mind since visiting Happisburgh, North Norfolk.

Although I’m well aware of and sympathise with the devastation such destructive erosion causes to the inhabitants of affected villages, my interest here was in capturing the energy and dynamism of the forces involved; of crumbling cliffs and bent and broken structures; the sheer power of the waves and the resulting twisted rusting metal, wooden and concrete forms.

I’ll be exhibiting more paintings from this series at my solo show from 24 March at the Grapevine Gallery, Burnham Market, North Norfolk, which will also feature artworks from my reedbeds series. This exhibition will run for one month, more details to follow.

spilling the beans …

It’s been a while since I posted, that time of year I suppose when we’re all hunkered down waiting for spring! However, I was recently taken on by an online gallery Singulart – who are based in France and whose remit is to promote contemporary artists from Europe (France, Germany and UK in particular) to new markets. They have just posted an online interview with me about my life in art, to their blog, which I thought you might find interesting to read.

The link to the full interview is here. Below is a snippet from it…

How did you find your voice as an artist?My earliest memory of art is of my first day at school, I would have been 5 years old, intently drawing marigold flowers in a work book. I can still see myself pressing the vivid green and orange crayons onto the page, forming the petals and stems…The Singulart blog also has interviews with other artists, giving glimpses into their lives and working processes, which you might also find interesting, so after you’ve read mine, why not explore!

monoprinting: a few results…

Monoprint © Mari French 2017

Monoprint © Mari French 2017

Well, here are some of the results of my recent monoprinting on gel plate sessions (as written about in my previous post here). I’m fairly pleased with some of them, not so sure about others, but trying out a completely different process or medium is a great way of shaking you out of an artist’s block or the doldrums or that feeling of ‘what next’. I recommend it!

I soon learnt a few things too…
Printmaking paper may work better than watercolour paper (less size), so I’ve ordered some Somerset smooth white paper;
Open acrylics (Golden) definitely work better (as do Atelier Interactive) as they don’t dry quite so fast. Alternatively I found that adding gloss acrylic medium helped with consistency and slowed down drying time a bit;
Allow lots of time for cleaning up and do it often, acrylics seem to dry particularly quickly on brayers.

 

I’d still like to produce the soft look of the paint on the gelli plate itself; by the time the image has been transferred to the paper it’s lost that quality. Something worth working on.

After a few days of producing these prints I decided to have a break and go back to painting (acrylics) for a while, and it’s been interesting how the monoprinting has fed back into the new paintings. But more of that in the next post!