on the high moors 2: emerging images…

White Cross (mixed media on board) © Mari French 2018White Cross (mixed media on board) © Mari French 2018

White Cross (mixed media on board) © Mari French 2018

Well, the recent trip to the high moors above Rosedale in the North York Moors I wrote about in my last post paid off inspiration-wise I’m pleased to report. If you haven’t seen that post you can read it here.

I’ve been on a bit of a roll since getting back in the studio – a new palette reflecting the stone, iron ore, soft purples and ochres of the late summer/early autumn moorland landscape of North Yorkshire. First came these small studies on paper, after checking through my photos and sketches:

Moors above Rosedale, North York Moors. (study) © Mari French 2018

Moors above Rosedale (study) © Mari French 2018

 

Then a few explorations in a more abstract graphic style of the distinctive medieval ‘wheelhead’ White Cross or ‘Fat Betty’ that sits up on the moorland at the crossroads of 3 parishes:

 

Eventually I allowed my subconscious to take over and without referring to any of these resources trusted to memory and instinct (the way I love to work!). I wanted a soft palette of green-greys, bruise-greys, and blue-greys with also a soft brick tone to reflect the outcrops of iron ore in the area. I often mixed these directly on the support itself. I tried 40x40cm canvas but found in this instance I was more happy working on watercolour board at a similar size.

Anyway, these works below (and top of this post) are what emerged. I’m very excited by them and enjoyed creating them so much. They’ve already aroused interest in two galleries. I’m pleased to report I’m taking these first three of this new series to a gallery in Sevenoaks, Kent at the end of September. Now looking forward to what else emerges in this series!

High moorland (mixed media on board) © Mari French 2018

High moorland (mixed media on board) © Mari French 2018

Land of iron (mixed media on board) © Mari French 2018

Land of iron (mixed media on board) © Mari French 2018

 

balancing act …

'Zawn' finished painting. © Mari French 2018.

‘Zawn’ finished painting. © Mari French 2018.

I’ve just sent off three new canvases in my Cornish Coves theme to The Harbour Gallery Portscatho in Cornwall as mentioned in a previous post. The one above is titled ‘Zawn’, which was the name given to deep and narrow sea-inlets in cliffs, often  exploited by tin and copper miners of the past. I thought you might be interested in seeing how the work developed.

The photo below shows the early stages of ‘Zawn’. I had no definite image in my mind at the start of this painting, other than the Cornish coastline theme. However, I think, having painted light and sea into the other canvases, I wanted to do something a little different here, to capture the power and looming presence of the rocks and cliffs of the wild Penwith coast.

'Zawn', 1st stage. 50x60cm, acrylic on canvas. © Mari French © 2018

‘Zawn’, 1st stage. © Mari French © 2018

At the beginning, I gave free rein to my paintstrokes, scumbling and scratching into the paint. I used a dryish brush in places to give the sparkle of light on rock and sand. The resulting image suggested to me a cave in a dark cliff and having come across several of these around Penwith, I decided to develop the work in that direction.

Inevitably some of the luscious marks and gestural passages at the start of a work eventually get painted over, often a hard decision to take; but without the confidence to do this editing, I find a finished artwork will have a static, tentative feel to it. (Of course another tricky, but important part of the process is leaving areas alone!). It’s a question of balance of freedom and control.

Below shows ‘Zawn’ almost finished. I decided I wasn’t happy with the pointy shapes in the background behind the large boulder on the right, so did some further work on them and tied the image together by suggesting a large rock instead, plus some line work (see top photo of this post).

IMG_5780

‘Zawn’ almost finished. © Mari French 2018

Hope you’ve enjoyed this insight into the creation of one of my semi-abstract landscapes. I find photographing some of the stages as I paint an invaluable record and self-teaching aid.

 

at the easel …

I don’t believe I’ve posted this video of me working in my studio on this blog before. In it I’m working on one of the recent reedbeds paintings in the scrumptious new palette I mentioned in a recent post. Apologies for the less than ideal angle of the camera, I seem to be blocking a fair bit of the process, but hopefully you’ll see enough to get the idea.

I’m in the zone here, happily blending acrylic paint directly onto the support (in this case Daler Rowney line board). The sunshine in my mind from the first day of Spring seems to be emerging in the process!