balancing act …

'Zawn' finished painting. © Mari French 2018.

‘Zawn’ finished painting. © Mari French 2018.

I’ve just sent off three new canvases in my Cornish Coves theme to The Harbour Gallery Portscatho in Cornwall as mentioned in a previous post. The one above is titled ‘Zawn’, which was the name given to deep and narrow sea-inlets in cliffs, often  exploited by tin and copper miners of the past. I thought you might be interested in seeing how the work developed.

The photo below shows the early stages of ‘Zawn’. I had no definite image in my mind at the start of this painting, other than the Cornish coastline theme. However, I think, having painted light and sea into the other canvases, I wanted to do something a little different here, to capture the power and looming presence of the rocks and cliffs of the wild Penwith coast.

'Zawn', 1st stage. 50x60cm, acrylic on canvas. © Mari French © 2018

‘Zawn’, 1st stage. © Mari French © 2018

At the beginning, I gave free rein to my paintstrokes, scumbling and scratching into the paint. I used a dryish brush in places to give the sparkle of light on rock and sand. The resulting image suggested to me a cave in a dark cliff and having come across several of these around Penwith, I decided to develop the work in that direction.

Inevitably some of the luscious marks and gestural passages at the start of a work eventually get painted over, often a hard decision to take; but without the confidence to do this editing, I find a finished artwork will have a static, tentative feel to it. (Of course another tricky, but important part of the process is leaving areas alone!). It’s a question of balance of freedom and control.

Below shows ‘Zawn’ almost finished. I decided I wasn’t happy with the pointy shapes in the background behind the large boulder on the right, so did some further work on them and tied the image together by suggesting a large rock instead, plus some line work (see top photo of this post).

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‘Zawn’ almost finished. © Mari French 2018

Hope you’ve enjoyed this insight into the creation of one of my semi-abstract landscapes. I find photographing some of the stages as I paint an invaluable record and self-teaching aid.

 

coves and harbours …

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Cove (i) © Mari French 2018

I’ve been falling behind a bit with my posts and this is the first one for May, so I better make up for it. It’s been very heartening to see so many people signing up to follow me lately and I’m very grateful. As is usual in Spring for me, May has been a pretty busy month, but one of the first things I want to tell you about is a new gallery that is now taking my work.

I’ve wanted to show in Cornwall for a while ever since doing art residencies in the area since 2014. So, when The Harbour Gallery Portscatho, asked me a few weeks back if I’d let them have a few pieces of my work, (having sold work for me through their online sister gallery BritishContemporary.Art ) I jumped at the chance. I was planning a week’s holiday (and sketching of course) in St Ives in May, so I was delighted to deliver the work myself.

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Cove (ii) © Mari French 2018

These two pieces (50x60cm mixed media on canvas, framed) are both inspired by my experience of the small rocky coves of the West Cornish coast. I’m so pleased to be showing with the award-winning Harbour Gallery as it’s not only a lovely busy artspace in the beautiful coastal village of Portscatho on the Rosedale peninsula near Truro, but the owner Mark David Hatwood is such a friendly and supportive person, a great salesman and also very effective with social media promotion for his artists.

Hopefully this will be a long and mutually successful collaboration.

For more on my recent sketching holiday in Cornwall, see my next post (coming very soon!).

Portscatho harbour, near Truro, Cornwall. © Mari French 2018

Portscatho harbour, near Truro, Cornwall. © Mari French 2018

Spring in the reed beds …

Reedbeds, Burnham Overy Staithe. © Mari French 2018

Reedbeds, Burnham Overy Staithe. © Mari French 2018

I stepped down the steep bank of the sea defences and out of the cold wind. Now on level with the huge swathe of reeds, the warm sun on my face, I could hear so many different birds belling, fluting and chiming, out of sight among the swaying blonde wands. Overhead, flocks of Brent and Pinkfoot geese clamoured and a pair of red kites circled in the sun.

This was last week on the first day of spring and I was walking along the marshes and creeks at Burnham Overy Staithe on the North Norfolk coast. Blue skies and bright sunshine drew me out sketching for the first time in ages and it was bliss to be out under that huge blue open dome of sky (apart from that cold wind of course).

Sketching reedbeds in spring sunshine. © Mari French 2018

Sketching reedbeds in spring sunshine. © Mari French 2018

There were so many bird species about, including a group of six avocets, the poster birds of the RSPB, with their upturned slender beaks, they danced their delicate crane-like courtship dance on the shining mudflats.

 

It may come as a surprise to some who see my work, but the calls, flight and tracks of coastal birds are often referenced in the guise of abstract meandering marks in my paintings. Along with the movement of the wind in reeds or over water, jet trails in the sky and my own wanderings, this is one of the techniques I employ to evoke a sense of my experience of a place.

Below is one of the resulting small mixed media works I produced in my studio this week, all fired up and inspired by that glorious day sketching the reed beds. I’ll post more soon.

'Reedbeds 1' © Mari French 2018

‘Reedbeds 1’ © Mari French 2018