Cornish sketchbook at Open Studio

Gosh its been quite a while since I last posted on here. It’s been such a busy couple of months. I’ve been away on a 2 week art residency at Brisons Veor, Cape Cornwall, which I’m planning on writing about soon. But in the meantime here’s a quick look at the sketchbook I worked in whilst there, which will be on show at my Open Studios May 27, 28, 29 and June 9, 10, 11 as part of Norwich & Norfolk Open Studios 2017. My studio is in Harpley, Norfolk and you can get more details and a map here. Hope to see you!

a painter’s progress …

Rosewall Hill (detail). © Mari French

Rosewall Hill (detail). © Mari French

 … every so often I get the urge to paint hills. I live in Norfolk (not flat, beautifully rolling – well it is where I live) and I love its sweeping beaches and huge skies, but I used to live on the Isle of Skye and I visit Cornwall often, so you can imagine I might enjoy a change in level occasionally. It’s also a change from the more abstract work I’ve been producing lately.

This painting in acrylics and watercolour pastel on deep sided canvas (80×60 cm), is inspired by Rosewall Hill on the Penwith peninsula, Cornwall. Not an accurate representation, I’ll admit, but for me it attempts to capture its looming presence over the moor.

It might not be completely finished yet, but I thought I’d share the progress of the work, step-by-step. Hope you find it interesting.

Rosewall Hill (stage 1). © Mari French. Acrylic and watercolour pastel on canvas depicting uphill landscape in Penwith, Cornwall.

Rosewall Hill (stage 1). © Mari French

 

I started with a very loose broad brush under-painting in Paynes grey and a mix of Raw Sienna and Titanium white to establish shape and tone (above). As with many of my canvases I prepped it first with a rough coating of texture paste, which I sometimes prefer to a perfectly flat surface.

I deliberately used an unusual colour palette next, of Wedgwood blue, Permanent Rose and a little white, roughly mixed on canvas, to unite the separate areas of the sky and foreground (below). I avoid greens like the plague in my landscapes, in case you hadn’t noticed! They’re too obvious, I prefer colours that create an atmosphere.

Rosewall Hill (stage 2). © Mari French

Rosewall Hill (stage 2). © Mari French

In the process much of the lovely initial under painting is lost, but I’ve learnt not to be too precious about this otherwise I’d  end up too nervous to create an effective artwork. 

I also had to adjust the shape and position of the hill a couple of times. Before the new purple mix dried I splashed and  dropped water here and there, allowing it to run in places, creating pale lines in the paint.

Rosewall Hill (stage 3). © Mari French

Rosewall Hill (stage 3). © Mari French

Having left the work for a few days I approached it today wanting to lighten it and get some marks and movement in there (below). Much of the violet colour is brushed over with a dryish mix of Yellow oxide and white, quite fast and vigorously, gain mixing on canvas. I then sprayed with water, semi-dried and wiped back in places. 

Finally, watercolour pastel (neocolour) in black, was scribbled on loosely, hinting at the rough land forms and distant skyline. To allow for any further over painting acrylic matt medium was carefully applied over the pastel and dried.

Comparing the last two stages, I feel the third stage might have made a finished painting, but I’m still excited by the way the work has developed. I’ll post any further changes if/when I make them.

Rosewall Hill (stage 4). © Mari French

Rosewall Hill (stage 4). © Mari French

 

a safer distance …

I’ve been developing my sketch ‘a safer distance’ further (see previous post ‘passing time’). This artwork is acrylic ink and tissue on watercolour paper, approx 40 x 45 cms. 

The original inspiration was the crumbling interior of a 19th century dynamite store at Cape Cornwall, a place I’ve visited a few times this year (see my post on the art residency I took at Brisons Veor). The small austere structure, perched on the rocks above Priests Cove, was originally part of Cape Cornwall Mine. The bolts and bars in the fabric of the interior walls were bleeding rust in a very interesting way. I seem to be very attracted to industrial archaeology lately.

I like that I can see other imagery in this. It feels there may be potential for a series here.

A safer distance. Acrylic ink/tissue on paper. Mari French 2014.

A safer distance. Acrylic ink/tissue on paper. Mari French 2014.

 

Old dynamite store, Cape Cornwall. Mari French 2014

Old dynamite store, Cape Cornwall. Mari French 2014