balancing act …

'Zawn' finished painting. © Mari French 2018.

‘Zawn’ finished painting. © Mari French 2018.

I’ve just sent off three new canvases in my Cornish Coves theme to The Harbour Gallery Portscatho in Cornwall as mentioned in a previous post. The one above is titled ‘Zawn’, which was the name given to deep and narrow sea-inlets in cliffs, often  exploited by tin and copper miners of the past. I thought you might be interested in seeing how the work developed.

The photo below shows the early stages of ‘Zawn’. I had no definite image in my mind at the start of this painting, other than the Cornish coastline theme. However, I think, having painted light and sea into the other canvases, I wanted to do something a little different here, to capture the power and looming presence of the rocks and cliffs of the wild Penwith coast.

'Zawn', 1st stage. 50x60cm, acrylic on canvas. © Mari French © 2018

‘Zawn’, 1st stage. © Mari French © 2018

At the beginning, I gave free rein to my paintstrokes, scumbling and scratching into the paint. I used a dryish brush in places to give the sparkle of light on rock and sand. The resulting image suggested to me a cave in a dark cliff and having come across several of these around Penwith, I decided to develop the work in that direction.

Inevitably some of the luscious marks and gestural passages at the start of a work eventually get painted over, often a hard decision to take; but without the confidence to do this editing, I find a finished artwork will have a static, tentative feel to it. (Of course another tricky, but important part of the process is leaving areas alone!). It’s a question of balance of freedom and control.

Below shows ‘Zawn’ almost finished. I decided I wasn’t happy with the pointy shapes in the background behind the large boulder on the right, so did some further work on them and tied the image together by suggesting a large rock instead, plus some line work (see top photo of this post).

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‘Zawn’ almost finished. © Mari French 2018

Hope you’ve enjoyed this insight into the creation of one of my semi-abstract landscapes. I find photographing some of the stages as I paint an invaluable record and self-teaching aid.

 

at the easel …

I don’t believe I’ve posted this video of me working in my studio on this blog before. In it I’m working on one of the recent reedbeds paintings in the scrumptious new palette I mentioned in a recent post. Apologies for the less than ideal angle of the camera, I seem to be blocking a fair bit of the process, but hopefully you’ll see enough to get the idea.

I’m in the zone here, happily blending acrylic paint directly onto the support (in this case Daler Rowney line board). The sunshine in my mind from the first day of Spring seems to be emerging in the process!

 

ice cream colours for Spring…

First day of Spring © Mari French 2018

First day of Spring © Mari French 2018

Since that sunny first day of Spring sketching in the reed beds at Burnham Overy Staithe, which I wrote about in my last post, I’ve had a wonderful time with a new palette of luscious colours, all inspired by that light-filled day at the coast.

Some of my social media followers have described these as ‘ice cream colours’, which I rather like. There’s a lot of happiness and pleasure in the works too. Sometimes we artists can struggle and fight with a painting to bring it to fruition, but the works here seemed to emerge while I was enjoying playing with the paint. And isn’t it great when that happens!

Burnished light © Mari French 2018

Burnished light © Mari French 2018

Some of these paintings are in my current solo exhibition ‘Fragile coast’ at Grapevine Gallery, Burnham Market, North Norfolk until June. You can read a bit more about the exhibition and my recent work here.

New spaces © Mari French 2018

New spaces © Mari French 2018