Surfacing…

Blakey Ridge, North York Moors, sketchbook, 2019. © Mari French

I recently spent a week in Rosedale, a beautiful valley in the North York Moors National Park. Although it was intended mainly as a relaxing break (and it was) I also wanted to revisit and spend time sketching the high moorland plateau that inspired me so much back in August last year (see my earlier post ).

 

On the last visit I’d been attracted to the dramatic ruins of the old ironstone mine workings above Rosedale, resulting in several abstract interpretations that were accepted for the Royal Institute of Painters in Water Colours 2019 at the Mall Galleries, London, four of which are now on show at Bils and Rye, a contemporary gallery in Kirkbymoorside, near Pickering, North Yorkshire.

Abstract landscape sketch of moorland under rain, in ink and charcoal.

Rain over Farndale Moor, North York Moors. Sketchbook © Mari French 2019

However, this time I was drawn to the variety of surface texture, linear marks, colour and play of light on the upland plateau itself. Whereas the flowering heather covered the moors in a glorious purple last august, this time the colours were quieter, with striking rectangular patches of burnt heather suggesting possibilities for abstraction. With the stone outcrops, yellow lichen, patches of sienna-coloured soil and the dry vegetation, lit by sun or deep in shadow, I was confronted with an extensive patchwork of textures. Now I need to think how I want to treat these surface impressions back in the studio and where I’m taking them.

Moorland surfaces, Castlerigg, North York Moors. Sketchbook © Mari French 2019

They’ve given me inspiration and a theme for a batch of new canvases that I need to produce for several exhibitions this year, in particular ‘Surface’ exhibition at Gallery East, Woodbridge, Suffolk, in September which will feature contemporary female artists from East Anglia and beyond.

coves and harbours …

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Cove (i) © Mari French 2018

I’ve been falling behind a bit with my posts and this is the first one for May, so I better make up for it. It’s been very heartening to see so many people signing up to follow me lately and I’m very grateful. As is usual in Spring for me, May has been a pretty busy month, but one of the first things I want to tell you about is a new gallery that is now taking my work.

I’ve wanted to show in Cornwall for a while ever since doing art residencies in the area since 2014. So, when The Harbour Gallery Portscatho, asked me a few weeks back if I’d let them have a few pieces of my work, (having sold work for me through their online sister gallery BritishContemporary.Art ) I jumped at the chance. I was planning a week’s holiday (and sketching of course) in St Ives in May, so I was delighted to deliver the work myself.

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Cove (ii) © Mari French 2018

These two pieces (50x60cm mixed media on canvas, framed) are both inspired by my experience of the small rocky coves of the West Cornish coast. I’m so pleased to be showing with the award-winning Harbour Gallery as it’s not only a lovely busy artspace in the beautiful coastal village of Portscatho on the Rosedale peninsula near Truro, but the owner Mark David Hatwood is such a friendly and supportive person, a great salesman and also very effective with social media promotion for his artists.

Hopefully this will be a long and mutually successful collaboration.

For more on my recent sketching holiday in Cornwall, see my next post (coming very soon!).

Portscatho harbour, near Truro, Cornwall. © Mari French 2018

Portscatho harbour, near Truro, Cornwall. © Mari French 2018

ice cream colours for Spring…

First day of Spring © Mari French 2018

First day of Spring © Mari French 2018

Since that sunny first day of Spring sketching in the reed beds at Burnham Overy Staithe, which I wrote about in my last post, I’ve had a wonderful time with a new palette of luscious colours, all inspired by that light-filled day at the coast.

Some of my social media followers have described these as ‘ice cream colours’, which I rather like. There’s a lot of happiness and pleasure in the works too. Sometimes we artists can struggle and fight with a painting to bring it to fruition, but the works here seemed to emerge while I was enjoying playing with the paint. And isn’t it great when that happens!

Burnished light © Mari French 2018

Burnished light © Mari French 2018

Some of these paintings are in my current solo exhibition ‘Fragile coast’ at Grapevine Gallery, Burnham Market, North Norfolk until June. You can read a bit more about the exhibition and my recent work here.

New spaces © Mari French 2018

New spaces © Mari French 2018